Adventure Guides

The Adventure Guides program focuses on the parent’s roll in the lives of their children including building confidence, forming bonds, and creating lifelong memories. Parents set an example leading children through fun games or activities which parallels the example parents set for children on their path through life. In the early years of a child’s life, the Adventure Guides (AK-5 grades) begin as a side by side journey for parent and child.

The YMCA Adventure Guides program focuses on the parent’s role as a guide in their child’s life.  The program experience begins as a side-by-side journey for a parent-child pair.  Parents lead, direct, and supervise activities that allow children to explore their world.  Additionally, parents teach, instill and demonstrate important values and skills to help prepare children for their path in life.  Eventually, children explore more advance, independent activities with their parents support.

These journeys happen within the context of small groups of parent-child pairs called Circles.  The Circle provides structures, community, and support for participants and activities.  Circles meet regularly whether it’s as an individual circle or as a Nation with all the other circles.

 

PROGRAM PURPOSE

To foster understanding and companionship between parent and child.

 

PROGRAM GOALS

  • Foster companionship and understanding; set a foundation for positive, lifelong relationships between parent and child.
  • Build a sense of self-esteem and personal worth.
  • Expand awareness of spirit, mind, and body.
  • Provide a framework to meet the mutual needs of parents and children for spending enjoyable, constructive, and quality time together.
  • Enhance the quality of family time.
  • Emphasize the vital role that a parent plays in the growth and development of a child.
  • Offer an important and unique opportunity to develop and enjoy volunteer leadership skills

PROGRAM AIMS

  • To be clean in body and pure in heart
  • To be friends forever with my dad/mom/son/daughter
  • To love the sacred circle of my family
  • To listen while others speak
  • To love my neighbor as myself
  • To respect the traditions and beliefs of all people
  • To seek and preserve the beauty of Our Creator’s work in forest, field, and stream
Around a simple campfire in 1026, two men engaged in a deep conversation about the spiritual relationship between father and son.   Joe Friday, an Ojibwa Indian, and his friend Harold Keltner, a YMCA director in St. Louis, reflected carefully on the events of history and the effect on the integrity of the family and quality of life.  Friday described the active role Native American father’s play in teaching his child the skills needed to thrive and the meaning and purpose of life.  This was different from Friday’s perception of how “white man’s son” was raised by the mother.
Inspired by his friendship with Joe Friday, Harold Keltner created a new YMCA program focused on father-son relationships and the strong qualities of dignity, patience, endurance, spirituality, feeling for the earth and concern for the family.  As the program grew and spread across the country in the 1950’s, it became known as the Indian Guides program.  Around WWII, the genuine need for supporting girls in their personal growth became more apparent.  Mother-daughter programs and father-daughter programs were established.    In 2003, to respect the wishes of the Native American community, the program name and emphasis was updated to the YMCA Adventure Guides program but strives to capture the intent and magic of the original program.
Vests:  The Patch Store
Craft Supplies:  Grey Owl Indian Crafts
Derby Car Preparation

Size:

Minimum
Maximum
Width 1 5/8 inches 3 1/8 inches
Height 1 inch 3 1/8 inches
Length 6 1/2 inches 7 inches

Weight:  5.0 ounce total weight limit for the car.

Weighting the car is acceptable, internal weighting is preferred.   If car is weighted on the bottom,
pay attention to the bottom clearance (approximately 3/8 inch).  All weights, accessories, toy
passengers, etc, must be securely fastened to the car.

All cars must have the appropriate year stamped on the bottom.  Do not remove the stamp, it will
be needed on race day. You cannot use previous year’s car.

No three wheel cars are allowed.  All four wheels must touch the track.

No slab cars allowed.

No wheel or axle modifications are allowed. Bushings or bearing are not permitted.  Axles must
be stationary.

Axles must be placed in the original axle slots of the car body.

Use of graphite or other lubricants is allowed.

No additions shall be made to the car which would extend past the starting gate of the track.

Please let your guide or princess do as much of the work as they can safely do on their car.  Don’t be
a perfectionist — crooked lines and rough edges are OK!  This is a team effort, not a father effort.  If
you have any questions on rules or car preparation, please contact one of the chiefs.

Program Overview

The YMCA Adventure Guides program focuses on the parent’s role as a guide in their child’s life.  The program experience begins as a side-by-side journey for a parent-child pair.  Parents lead, direct, and supervise activities that allow children to explore their world.  Additionally, parents teach, instill and demonstrate important values and skills to help prepare children for their path in life.  Eventually, children explore more advance, independent activities with their parents support.

These journeys happen within the context of small groups of parent-child pairs called Circles.  The Circle provides structures, community, and support for participants and activities.  Circles meet regularly whether it’s as an individual circle or as a Nation with all the other circles.

 

PROGRAM PURPOSE

To foster understanding and companionship between parent and child.

 

PROGRAM GOALS

  • Foster companionship and understanding; set a foundation for positive, lifelong relationships between parent and child.
  • Build a sense of self-esteem and personal worth.
  • Expand awareness of spirit, mind, and body.
  • Provide a framework to meet the mutual needs of parents and children for spending enjoyable, constructive, and quality time together.
  • Enhance the quality of family time.
  • Emphasize the vital role that a parent plays in the growth and development of a child.
  • Offer an important and unique opportunity to develop and enjoy volunteer leadership skills

PROGRAM AIMS

  • To be clean in body and pure in heart
  • To be friends forever with my dad/mom/son/daughter
  • To love the sacred circle of my family
  • To listen while others speak
  • To love my neighbor as myself
  • To respect the traditions and beliefs of all people
  • To seek and preserve the beauty of Our Creator’s work in forest, field, and stream
Calendar
History
Around a simple campfire in 1026, two men engaged in a deep conversation about the spiritual relationship between father and son.   Joe Friday, an Ojibwa Indian, and his friend Harold Keltner, a YMCA director in St. Louis, reflected carefully on the events of history and the effect on the integrity of the family and quality of life.  Friday described the active role Native American father’s play in teaching his child the skills needed to thrive and the meaning and purpose of life.  This was different from Friday’s perception of how “white man’s son” was raised by the mother.
Inspired by his friendship with Joe Friday, Harold Keltner created a new YMCA program focused on father-son relationships and the strong qualities of dignity, patience, endurance, spirituality, feeling for the earth and concern for the family.  As the program grew and spread across the country in the 1950’s, it became known as the Indian Guides program.  Around WWII, the genuine need for supporting girls in their personal growth became more apparent.  Mother-daughter programs and father-daughter programs were established.    In 2003, to respect the wishes of the Native American community, the program name and emphasis was updated to the YMCA Adventure Guides program but strives to capture the intent and magic of the original program.
Gallery
Resources
Vests:  The Patch Store
Craft Supplies:  Grey Owl Indian Crafts
Derby Car Preparation

Size:

Minimum
Maximum
Width 1 5/8 inches 3 1/8 inches
Height 1 inch 3 1/8 inches
Length 6 1/2 inches 7 inches

Weight:  5.0 ounce total weight limit for the car.

Weighting the car is acceptable, internal weighting is preferred.   If car is weighted on the bottom,
pay attention to the bottom clearance (approximately 3/8 inch).  All weights, accessories, toy
passengers, etc, must be securely fastened to the car.

All cars must have the appropriate year stamped on the bottom.  Do not remove the stamp, it will
be needed on race day. You cannot use previous year’s car.

No three wheel cars are allowed.  All four wheels must touch the track.

No slab cars allowed.

No wheel or axle modifications are allowed. Bushings or bearing are not permitted.  Axles must
be stationary.

Axles must be placed in the original axle slots of the car body.

Use of graphite or other lubricants is allowed.

No additions shall be made to the car which would extend past the starting gate of the track.

Please let your guide or princess do as much of the work as they can safely do on their car.  Don’t be
a perfectionist — crooked lines and rough edges are OK!  This is a team effort, not a father effort.  If
you have any questions on rules or car preparation, please contact one of the chiefs.

Investing The Time Is Worth It!

Parents can expect to meet once or twice a month for either a smaller Circle activity or a larger event with all Circles present. Activities may include educational events, bowling, volunteering, derby car race, and campouts at YMCA Camp Wapsie.  Parent volunteers plan and organize activities.

Learning Responsibility

With all this fun, there is still time to learn social responsibility. During the campouts, at YMCA Camp Wapsie, each circle collects non-perishable foods to donate to the Marion Food Bank.  At one campout, just under 800 items were collected and donated.  Additionally, one small circle group volunteered to ring a Red Kettle Bell during the holidays.

Young guide walking on a rope bridge across swampy water

For more information, contact Camp or Ben Jensen, Federation Navigator.

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